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Is this SSD wear concerning?

I picked up this SSD on eBay (SanDisk X400) in June to eventually replace a 8 year old laptop due to age and battery wear issues. However, I have since setup the laptop and I did a wear check, especially on a used SSD… Potentially not good.

Disk reinitialization (done due to prior red flags noticed early in testing):

Block Image

Block Image

Write (post reinitialize):

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Block Image

Read (post reinitialize):

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Block Image

This SSD is a 75TBW drive, and it went from 90>88% due to the checks I did on it. Yes, the wear wasn’t 100% necessary but due to the severe amount of wear I noticed doing the initial write check, I wanted to go over it closely. Should I be concerned? PS: The laptop doesn’t require SATA II - it supports SATA III.

SMART data:

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Block Image

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If you doubt it, don’t use it. Nothing beats peace of mind.

Show us S.M.A.R.T data instead of this block diagram, it isn’t particularly useful.

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Posted SMART data.

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@nick there is no reserve or CRC event, so it looks good to me.

If you don’t trust it, buy a new one, peace of mind is much more worthwhile than saving a couple bucks on a cheap SSD.

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Until you can get better info on the color coding it will be hard to tell what its telling us.

The depth of the green color must have some reason. Is the darker it is the more used?

Block Image

The fact you altered the color to a light green I think points that way so you’ve basically cleared the controllers table! Thats not good, as you don’t want the assume the worn block is clean.

So the bottom line here is what is this tool doing? Is it really telling you anything useful? Or just zeroing the table so it looks nice!

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The photo you clipped here is the wear indicator in HDS. If you see a light green block, then the block is perfect. As the performance of each block drops, it gets darker. The reason I tried to more or less refresh the drive is I don't feel like taking the computer apart again to put another SSD in, frankly. So yes, I cheated just a little. I set it up before I checked. It's not hard to swap, but it IS annoying - 11 screws need to come out and I need to switch the drive in the 2.5" caddy. This SSD has always read well, but has write issues. Last time I setup a machine without checking before it gets installed, especially a used SSD - I think someone defragged it, ran this close to full for a LONG time due to the extreme wear and initial 10% TBW use.

So think like this: Light green=good, moderately dark=may be an issue, dark green=worn sector.

The reason I tried to more or less refresh the drive is I don't feel like taking the computer apart again to put another SSD in, frankly. So yes, I cheated just a little. As much as I dread having to do it since I need to backup the drive if I pull a healthier 256GB class SSD, or buy one (yes, I chose this specific size on purpose since they're cheap, and are descent bulk storage drives if not used as an OS drive).

Overwrites the disk surface with special initialization pattern to restore the sectors to default (empty) status and reads back sector contents, to verify if they are accessible and consistent. Forces the analysis of any weak sectors and verifies any hidden problems and fixes them by reallocation of bad sectors (this is drive regeneration).

Enables better use of the disk as after the test the spare area will be used instead of any problematic sectors. Very intensive and time-consuming test, especially if the level (the number of overwrite cycles) is set to higher value.

The simple version of this test is usually (incorrectly) called as low level format by other tools. The test measures transfer time for all blocks to reveal which areas of the surface are slower. As the block is slower, the associated color is darker.

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@nick - Sorry the bottomline is the same clear the table so it looks nice! The wear level of a block should never be reset this is how people get into trouble! As they ASS/U/ME its healthy when its not!

Just lift the rug up ands sweep the dirt under it, thats fine!

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@danj I was just seeing if I can get away with it :P.

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@nick - Sadly it looks like a useless tool for SSD's, HDD's are a bit different! Unlike a SSD the HDD magnetic state can get messed up so zeroing it out is not an issue and is often what I do to save a drive.

You don't really want to use tools intended for HDD's for SSD's as they are very different! There is no tracks or sectors in SSD's, just direct cell blocks. HDD tools will in fact damage SSD's! Writing patterns only wears the drive. Unlike a HDD a simple erase and format is only needed.

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@danj I tried, I guess.

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If that doesn’t work,

try an OWC ssd they last
https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/S3D7...

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