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Fuse blowing when door is opened

Fuse blows if door is opened before end of heating. Can be opened anytime not in heating part of cycle.

Update (08/16/2018)

Model is JVM3160 Df. How would I find the schematic for this?

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davkal what model is your microwave?

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Mine too…never had a microwave to auto trip circuit when open door in middle of cooking time to check n stir food ..;@ All shuts off completely….Safety precaution maybe But all these years cooking with a microwave Never had this problem until buying this brand type…Had GE before this worked just fine for almost 15 years…Just gets very frustrating to try to remember turn off before open door to check food After in habit many years doing without circuit shutting down ;@ Also happens to my husband & son because we are use to opening door checking food then reclose door tap to finish cooking & no need to restart all cooking time again to finish cooking …,like the way use to work for many years before no problems !!!

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I just fixed mine!!! I saw that the bottom or third switch was very loose. I placed a small Zip tie around the housing and the switch. between when it started to be housing and the middle of the two connection. I checked it and now no blown fuses. I didn't want to glue or other permanent attachments, so that i can replace the switches if they do go bad. I hope this helps others.

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Sorry i need to add that i only secured the second and third or middle and bottom switches

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I had this same problem with a 4 year old GE microwave. Both door latch slides were wore slightly so I used JB marine weld to epoxy stronger plastic pieces (cut from a credit card) on the slide area to square up the wore ends. This worked great for not blowing the fuse but now when closing the door the fan and inside light come on. It is not actually turning the heating mechanism on or turning the plate. What the heck is that all about?

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Here’s an answer I’ve not seen elsewhere: Over time the door latch wears down such that the timing of the interlock switches gets confused. There are three switches that must activate in the correct order. When the latch is worn, the timing of the two lower switches is disrupted. After trying everything else (and I mean EVERYTHING), I noticed the worn latch and started experimenting, opening and closing the door very slowly and listening for the switches to activate. They must be out of sync, somehow. How can I correct it? Believe it or not, I simply wrapped some duct tape around the tip of the lower black plastic latch. This caused one of the lower switches to activate a fraction of a second sooner . . . before the second switch . . . and the problem was solved.

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Thanks, Charles! After looking everywhere and trying everything else as you did, your duct tape solution is what fixed mine. How were you able to make the duct tape stay on the lower black latch without it becoming stuck in the cavity after opening and closing the door? I ended putting duct tape into the actual cavity and so far it has stayed.

Just out of curiosity, did you try replacing the latch board (https://www.geapplianceparts.com/store/p...) as well? That was going to be my next step before seeing your post.

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The door safety interlock switch is bad or the connection terminals at the magnetron capacitor is loose causing arching/intermittent voltage surge. WARNING the capacitor is storing high voltage and is a potential shock hazard.

A qualified repair technician is highly suggested to service your microwave oven.

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I replaced the capacitor. I have had the door switches out and don't appear to be bad. Fuse does not blow if I end cycle with the cancel button.

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My microwave oven had a similar issue. Opening the door while on is another option to stop the cooking cycle. My fuse blowing was a result of one of the two interlock switches failing. I assume your replacement fuse is the proper type and specific rating. Sounds like the fuse your using is sensitive to the voltage surge when interrupting the cooking cycle by opening the door. You could try a ceramic delay burn fuse it is not your standard fast blow fuse. It absorbs surge and is available with the same rating as the original fuse.

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Had the switches out. Seem to be ok. Mounted in plastic so should not short to ground. If fuse does not blow it will still trip the 20 amp circuit breaker.

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It is designed flaw of many owens. It is ridiculous schematic to prevent microwave to work with even slightly opened door - one hundreds of inch may counts. That middle switch shorten 127 VAC power and blow the fuse. Just committing suicide. Strange way to protect. Seems that is UL idea for double killing. Or job security for repair shops. And all is that done by mechanically operated switches located on plastic support. No adjustments can be done to assure that middle switch operates before the door switch (commonly upper of three switches) will cut the power. Slight looseness of any mechanical detail or door misalignment can cause the power still applied when middle switch shorten power and blow up the fuse. In several such case the switch can weld contacts together and fuse will be blown every time when plug into outlet. Not sure that this switch is necessary at all. At least all mechanical design must be much, much more simple and reliable. It is 21-th century, people!

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Thank you Igor!! You got me on the right track. That dang plastic housing. In my case on my 3 year old unit the top hole of the plastic housing was very slightly worn down. It was enough to be slightly out of sync causing the fuse to blow. I almost have up before I saw your post. Much appreciated!

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SOLVED:

I had the same problem with a 3 year old GE Microwave. It comes down to a design flaw. I changed the capacitor and all three switches and still had the problem. The issue turned out to be the white plastic housing that holds the 3 switches. Over time the hooks from the door latches wear away where they meet the white housing. In my case the top hole wore down faster than the lower hole causing the switches to release at different times when the door is opened which will in turn send a power surge to blow the fuse. Attached a picture of the worn piece.

Certainly check the continuity of the switches first. Second I would replace the plastic piece holding the switches. I say do those first because they are the most likely causes and you don’t have to take the microwave down to do it. Lastly, if you still have problems, I would change the capacitor (DANGER - capacitors hold a potentially deadly charge).

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I think I have the same wear problem on the latch board with my GE microwave that is blowing fuses if I open the door. As others have said, timing or adjustments are critical, and this wear pattern disrupts correct operation. I found ebay to have a better price and documentation on the latch board than the online parts places.

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I replaced my switches last year to fix this, but the problem is back and the switches test fine today, so thanks for posting this "wear" problem! When I open the door I can hear the dual switches on the bottom disengaging first, but I was able to glean from Igor's post, the top switch needs to disengage first (or at least all at once).

We have short people in our household, so the door is often pulled from the lowest angle possible, likely contributing to uneven wear and flexion of the door so that the bottom comes out before the top.

Temporary Solution: I was able to temporarily fix this (and confirm it is not a capacitor problem) by adjusting the position of the white switch housing so that the top is tilted back, and the bottom is closer to the door. While the difference is only a matter of millimeters, this is allowing the switches to disengage in the correct sequence!

next.. going to order the new switch housing!

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I took away the switch in the middle. That switch simply short 120 AC power when door opens. If there still power, it just blow the fuse. It is overkill, because another switch (top one) opens when door is open and cancel 120AC power from outlet. It is double protection (not necessary for my opinion). Timing is the problem and with flimsy plastic supports of all three switches shortening switch can close before power interrupted by top (power) switch. That will blow the fuse. And one can change a dozen of switches and other parts, but will have the same problem. Can try to redesign switch support, adjust switches position making timing reliable, but just eliminating shortening switch is an easy and fast solution. I blew up four fuses in couple weeks, but now microwave works without problems.

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If you take that switch out, beware that you can actually microwave yourself in the event the other relay welds together. That is the purpose of the "crobar" relay you removed which results in a "fail-safe" condition to the user at the expense of blowing a fuse or tripping a breaker, or even damaging the microwave itself. I have this same problem in my microwave, and though I haven't had time to fix it, I decided that rather than subject my family to this risk, everyone now presses the stop button before opening the door. I highly recommend you put that safety switch back into your unit or you could be inviting a disaster to yourself or someone you care about. Better yet, if you don't know what you're doing (obviously because you removed it) you should spend a few hundred dollars and just go get a new microwave. I have a master's in electrical engineering, and although I hate the concept of crowbar circuits, I understand they are a necessary evil. And they will save your life when absolutely needed.

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Igor, that's a bold move, but this information definitely helped me from a troubleshooting standpoint. Thanks for posting!

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Brad, you are right with your concerns. Thank you. I began noticing that fans starts and plate rotates for one sec when I opening the door. But only when opening microwave door before loading food. Never after heating cycle was completed. So pushing stop may not help. I tested if there is HF power when I open the door with a piece of aluminum foil (not very reliable method). No heating. Maybe should test with less conductive material. But if want to be on safe side - better buy more reliable MW. Changing fuses several times a day is not an option, otherwise you will move fuse outside enclosure and have dozens of those. Definitely it is flaw in firmware (can easily delay in FW) and in design idea that is from 196x?

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This also solved my problem.... ironically, what Brad Riching said was exactly what I needed. I needed to understand why this switch was connected between hot and neutral. I took apart the switch to insure it was good and actually scrapped the connection (inside the switch) with some sand paper to give it a little more "distance" before connecting to a closed position and that solved it for me. I would prefer having this "crowbar" switch in there than remove it completely and have no chance of having a 3rd backup.

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I found the schematic and trouble shooting chart folded inside the back of the control panel on my JVM3160DF2WW. Did you find a solution to your fuse blowing problem? Mine is blowing the 20A fuse at first when opened door during cooking. I found the lower left hand bracket for the door hinge was loose (the spot weld broke). I fixed it with a small low profile bolt and a nut with lock washer in a pre-drilled hole behind the door when you remove the door. The door was sagging a bit before the fix but it blew another fuse on startup. I need to check the door switches.

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Most homes have circuitry that's limited to a 3000w per set and you can have multiple sets such as when set runs the ceiling lights other sets run other rooms walls or sections of the house. However just 3,000 watt limit makes it so you can't run a frigerator the toaster and a heater or a microwave on the same circuit. If that was your case there would be some understanding of why you could be tripping the circuit when you open the door in microwave but I don't think that's your case. You should test the microwave on an unoccupied circuit (that is one that has little or nothing plugged into it most likely a garage). If the device were to trip the circuit all by itself that would mean that there is a short within the microwave and the door could be all or part of the trigger. A spot where our concurred should be noticeable you are in fact creating a surge which is what trips the breaker and this should be noticeable if you were to get inside it. Since you have a limited electrical knowledge I would recommend replacing the unit strictly on the grounds that is much safer than having a microwave burn down in your kitchen.

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Casper

If you read my answer, it said the fuse was blown, not that the circuit breaker tripped. I think almost all microwaves have a 15A or 20A fuse at the inlet power cord. Also, what makes you think I have limited electrical knowledge? I have an advanced degree in Electrical Engineering and after looking at the schematic, I have a part on order that I suspect is causing the problem. Additionally, circuit breakers trip based on current flow exceeding their rated limit, not wattage as you said. Standard kitchen wiring calls for 20A lines for appliances. At 120 volts it would only take 2400 watts to cause a 20A circuit breaker to trip.

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Arthur Rubinstein I do not see where CASPER YOUNG directed anything toward your answer or toward you. I do not see where it was said that "you" have a limited electrical knowledge. It looks to me like his answer is directed toward the OP. Consider cooling your jets and not to take things personal.

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So Arthur : what part did you order? Did it work? Mine does the same stuff. Replaced all the door switches, even though the originals checked out ok. They were cheap. Trying, w limited success, to train the wife to turn the unit off before opening door.

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The first part I ordered was a replacement for the Power Relay because I found mine would sometimes stay closed or opened slowly allowing power to still flow to the high voltage transformer. If the monitor switch closes before this relay opens it will blow the fuse. The part was ordered from China on ebay for $4, SONG CHUAN 302 302WP-1AH-C M02 12VDC and took 2 weeks to come. The relay in the microwave was the same number except M07 which I do not think is available anymore. The M02 is probably faster opening so it is better. That still did not correct the fuse blowing but I think it was one reason. I found the Monitor switch, the middle of the 3 switches on mine not always working properly. After replacing the monitor switch (KW3A normally closed from ebay) the fuse did not blow when opening the door to interrupt a cook cycle. Comments are limited in size so read the next comment also...

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I found some other strange behavior that was related to the door sagging (see my comment above) and also how tightly the door closed. After fixing the door hinge, I noticed there was some slack on the right side of the door where the handle is. I could move the door slightly by pushing and pulling on the handle without opening it. I could also move the door up and down by pushing up under the handle (enough to cause the Secondary switch, the bottom one to open and close). I got rid of most of this slack by loosening the 2 screws that holds the bracket for the door switches and making sure the bracket was pushed down (against the two plastic overhangs that only let it go down so far) and simultaneously pushed back into the microwave so that the door would close tighter. The holes for the screws were slotted to allow some movement. When your done you can test the operation of each switch with and ohmeter and repeatedly opening and closing the door. Check your door first, easier than replacing the relay.

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No, but I modified the tip of the lower latch itself by adding some 2 or 3 layers of duct tape. Not the most elegant solution, but it works for quite a while before the tape gets worn and needs to be renewed. A properly trimmed and mounted strip of tin can would be more permanent . . . either applied to the tip of the latch or, preferably, glued to the worn portion of the latch board.

Also bought a couple dozen fuses from China. Cheap. If a little too short, just carefully bend in the fuse mounting brackets. The control board slides onto slots (as you know) and doesn’t need to be screwed in. Same with the upper plastic piece over the door. Same with the shield in front of the fuse. As a result - AFTER UNPLUGGING - I can replace a blown fuse in about two minutes without tools.

Long term solution? Avoid GE microwaves in the future. Cheap, shoddy and rickety . . . plus replacement parts are exorbitant. Classic modern planned obsolescence.

Oh, and don’t use Goof Off to clean tape residue off the control panel. It reacts with and clouds the plastic.

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Tim,

Thanks fo the comment. My fuses don’t blow, the breaker trips. I was thinking about adding tin or something similar. How would U attach it? Cheers

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Charles, sorry for calling U Tim

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My plastic latch area was worn only about a 1/32 " but that was enough to cause the blown fuses. There were 3 switches and the middle one which crowbars the power and blows the fuses, ends up closing first due to the worn out plastic. I bent and glued a very thin piece of metal ( from an old floppy disk slide cover - PERFECT thickness) over the worn plastic area about 6 months ago I believe...so far still working fine...thanks to all who brought this to my attention, I thought the fuse flowing was a bad diode or capacitor.

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Thanks Jeff, what kind of glue did U use?

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My latch board has worn (grooves) again. 2nd board worn out in 4 years! Not happy! A new board will solve the problem again. Has anyone altered the board by installing a hard wear surface?

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My plastic latch area was worn only about a 1/32 " but that was enough to cause the blown fuses. I bent and glued a very thin piece of metal ( from an old floppy disk slide cover - PERFECT thickness) over the worn plastic area about 6 months ago I believe...so far still working fine...thanks to all who brought this to my attention, I thought the fuse flowing was a bad diode or capacitor.

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Thanks folks for the information on this thread; it has proven most helpful. Our 5-year-old over-the-range GE microwave has been blowing fuses, but I think that your input has helped resolve the problem.

I live in a northern Canadian city. Our microwave is mounted on an exterior wall and vents straight to the outside. Yes it gets cold. A couple years ago, when it was really cold outside (below -30C) it blew a fuse when the door opened. Last year, this started to happen more often, when we were only at -20C. Earlier this winter it started happening at -10C.

I found this thread and the next time the fuse blew, I took a look at the switches and found that they had some play in where they were positioned. My guess is that the cold weather caused them to shift such that when the door opened they did not open/close in the right order. I shimmed them so that the switches were better fixed in place and would trigger in the required order. So far (and I’m knocking on wood here) even though we are going through a -20C cold patch, the microwave is continuing to operate without blowing a fuse.

So thank you for your insight and advice!

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