crwdns2894164:0crwdne2894164:0
crwdns2894186:0crwdne2894186:0

crwdns2893794:0crwdne2893794:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

-HP seems to have more keyboard issues then motherboard problems, especially within the last 5 years. It used to be motherboards when they got to 6-10 years old, but they seem to be more prone to keyboard failure these days - although you still see both. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
+HP seems to have more keyboard issues then motherboard problems, especially within the last 5 years. It used to be motherboards when they got to 6-10 years old, but they seem to be more prone to keyboard failure these days - although you still see both. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [link|http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts and yours is no exception :-(. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to re-secure the keyboard to the plastic once broken off. '''However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the common design flaw HP has done on quite a few models over the years, but there’s a catch. In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown but it is at least doable.''' Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a known DOA for repair design like this - you’ll need the time to get it right. I’m not shocked since this isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for having poor serviceability on the HP Consumer machines.
+Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts and yours is no exception :-(. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to re-secure the keyboard to the plastic once broken off. '''However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the common design flaw HP has done on quite a few models over the years, but there’s a catch. In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown but it is at least doable.''' Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that’s DOA for repair design like this - you’ll need the time to get it right. '''This is not the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last on the Consumer side!''' The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it right on the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with recommending HP Business hardware, but I’m also going to call them out for having poor serviceability on the HP Consumer machines.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies as each layout/country format is different. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard, if possible. '''If not, narrow it down to the country your keyboard is from and have the standard and Leap Motion Spare# on hand so you know what you need after confirming the part by taking the laptop apart unless you know for sure on the Leap Motion issue. These keyboards may not interchange so you probably don’t want to try your luck unless you can confirm elsewhere you can use a Leap Motion keyboard on a non-Leap Motion system. It may not work the other way around, so bear that in mind.'''
With your machine being an HP, parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for my used Dell systems. It’s not impossible, but it does require a little know-how on where to get them and HOW to search. Using the part# on the modern machines is usually enough because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

-Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
+HP seems to have more keyboard issues then motherboard problems, especially within the last 5 years. It used to be motherboards when they got to 6-10 years old, but they seem to be more prone to keyboard failure these days - although you still see both. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual serviceability design flaw HP loves to use, but there’s a catch. '''In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
+Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts and yours is no exception :-(. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to re-secure the keyboard to the plastic once broken off. '''However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the common design flaw HP has done on quite a few models over the years, but there’s a catch. In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown but it is at least doable.''' Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a known DOA for repair design like this - you’ll need the time to get it right. I’m not shocked since this isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for having poor serviceability on the HP Consumer machines.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies as each layout/country format is different. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard, if possible. '''If not, narrow it down to the country your keyboard is from and have the standard and Leap Motion Spare# on hand so you know what you need after confirming the part by taking the laptop apart unless you know for sure on the Leap Motion issue. These keyboards may not interchange so you probably don’t want to try your luck unless you can confirm elsewhere you can use a Leap Motion keyboard on a non-Leap Motion system. It may not work the other way around, so bear that in mind.'''
-In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for Dell systems, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. Using the part# on the modern machines is fine because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.
+With your machine being an HP, parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for my used Dell systems. It’s not impossible, but it does require a little know-how on where to get them and HOW to search. Using the part# on the modern machines is usually enough because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual serviceability design flaw HP loves to use, but there’s a catch. '''In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
+Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual serviceability design flaw HP loves to use, but there’s a catch. '''In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for Dell systems, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. Using the part# on the modern machines is fine because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual HP design flaw, but there’s a catch. In order to service just the keyboard, it requires a '''complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
+Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual serviceability design flaw HP loves to use, but there’s a catch. '''In order to replace the keyboard, it requires a complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for Dell systems, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. Using the part# on the modern machines is fine because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual HP design flaw, but there’s a catch :-). In order to service just the keyboard, it requires a '''complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
+Most of the modern HP Consumer notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual HP design flaw, but there’s a catch. In order to service just the keyboard, it requires a '''complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
-In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically work for HP most, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.
+In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as it is for me to get them for Dell systems, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. Using the part# on the modern machines is fine because they’re still plentiful but for a older system, you often need additional information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a DOA for repair design like this before to avoid breaking anything. This is not new to me with HP - their consumer models are notoriously bad, yet they get good press for the Elite and Z series and people think their entire lineup is just as good.
+Most of the modern HP notebooks made since around 2014-2015 use a keyboard that is spot welded in with plastic posts. On these machines, you need to replace the palmrest since there is no reliable way to secure the parts broken on them. However, yours seems to be the exception to the rule to the usual HP design flaw, but there’s a catch :-). In order to service just the keyboard, it requires a '''complete teardown''' but it is at least doable. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a design that is known to be DOA for repair to avoid breaking anything. This isn’t the first time they did something stupid and it won’t be the last time with the Consumer machines. The part that absolutely annoys me about it is they put this kind of bad design on consumer systems, yet they get it so right the Elite and Z series. I’m still okay with endorsing HP Business hardware, but I’m also okay with calling them out for a total double standard on serviceability like this.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically work for HP most, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their consumer models with these faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
+Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with a DOA for repair design like this before to avoid breaking anything. This is not new to me with HP - their consumer models are notoriously bad, yet they get good press for the Elite and Z series and people think their entire lineup is just as good.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically do it for HP at least 95% of the time, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live since there are multiple different country layouts. The best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard.
+
+In the case of yours, you also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system since they use a very specific part. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically work for HP most, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
-Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
+Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their consumer models with these faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically do it for HP at least 95% of the time, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically do it for HP at least 95% of the time, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically do it for HP at least 95% of the time, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information. This is new enough to just rely on the HP Spare# to find it.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard. HP parts aren’t as easy to get as Dell parts, so it does require a little know-how on where to get them. That said, using the part number will typically do it for HP at least 95% of the time, but it has to be sort of modern otherwise you need to have more working information.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live, but the best way to get it if you have the laptop open is to reference the bad keyboard. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
-The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live.
+The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live. You also need to know if you have a Leap Motion system, since these use a specific keyboard.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893796:0crwdne2893796:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

-Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found ['''http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
+Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found''' [http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].
Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.
The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open

crwdns2893792:0crwdne2893792:0 Nick ,

crwdns2893800:0crwdne2893800:0:

Bad keyboards on the HP notebooks are as common as the motherboards. You didn’t explicitly say it’s an HP laptop, but the model number read as HP to me. The model number is '''Envy 17-J005TX. The service manual can be found ['''http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03922401|here].

Most of the modern HP notebooks (2014+) spot weld it into the palmrest and need to have that replaced to fix a faulty keyboard, but this seems to be the exception to the rule with that design flaw :-). However, it requires a '''complete teardown''', but it can be done. Consider it a weekend project if you haven’t dealt with their faulty for repair designs they’ve put on the market for the past few years and study the service manual to make sure you can do it.

The HP Spare# is in the manual, and you will need to figure out which one applies based on where you live.

crwdns2892198:0crwdne2892198:0:

open