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crwdns2886882:0crwdnd2886882:0crwdne2886882:0 crwdns2886883:0Apple Watch Series 3crwdnd2886883:0crwdnd2886883:0crwdne2886883:0

  1. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown, Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 1, image 1 of 1
    • What's that in your shiny new Apple Watch?

    • Second-generation OLED Retina display with Force Touch

    • Consistent with the original Apple Watch, the Series 3 comes in two sizes: 38 mm (272 × 340 pixels, 290 ppi) and 42 mm (312 × 390 pixels, 302 ppi).

    • Custom-designed Apple S3 SiP (System in Package)

    • Optional LTE and UMTS, built in GPS/GLONASS + NFC + Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n 2.4 GHz + Bluetooth 4.2

    • Accelerometer + gyroscope + heart rate sensor + microphone + speaker + barometric altimeter + ambient light sensor

    • Water resistance rating (up to 50 meters)

    • WatchOS 4

  2. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 2, image 1 of 2 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 2, image 2 of 2
    • Before we get inside, put on your X-ray glasses for a sneak peek.

    • Many Bothans died to bring us this information. Just kidding. This image is courtesy of the friendly X-ray experts at Creative Electron.

    • While the overall layout is fairly unchanged from the original Apple Watch we tore down and X-rayed in 2015, it looks like there may be a few extra solder pads under the speaker (top right of this image).

  3. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 3, image 1 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 3, image 2 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 3, image 3 of 3
    • Time for a quick check of the back to make sure we bought the right watch.

    • Yep, this here is an Apple Watch Series 3, the most exclusive and top of the line Apple wrist computer, offering unparalleled computing power and fashion for the next 51 weeks.

    • We even got the LTE model!

    • Next to that secret diagnostic port we picked out a new model number: A1889.

  4. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 5, image 1 of 2 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 5, image 2 of 2
    • Cables de-ZIF'd, we're clear to get a look at the display.

    • Spec-wise, the display is unchanged from the Series 2, with one key difference—it now functions as a multifrequency (LTE?) antenna.

    • We'll be testing compatibility to see if the displays really are interchangeable.

    • This display has one fewer IC than last year. Probably wasn't important.

    • Analog Devices 343S00092 touch controller

    • NXP Semiconductor PN80V NFC module

    • Texas Instruments TPS36372 display power management (likely)

    • Empty solder pad (20211CP TD1628A goes here?)

    • As in the prior version, further access is barred by a tiny tri-point screw—one of 64 possible contingencies we've come prepared for.

    • The top third of the watch is labeled "Taptic Engine," and that's mostly true—but the label also hides a bracket that guards, among other things, the battery connector we're searching for.

    • Time to pick away the power pack and see what gives this watch its all-day go-juice.

    • Professional teardown engineer on a closed track. Do not attempt battery replacement on the go.

  5. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 7, image 1 of 2 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 7, image 2 of 2
  6. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 8, image 1 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 8, image 2 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 8, image 3 of 3
    • So far so good. We pull out the standard Force Touch sensor/gasket, equipped with the same Analog Devices AD7149 capacitance sensor controller that we found in the Series 2.

    • Continuing our parts-picking spree, we pluck out the Taptic Engine, seemingly unchanged from watches yore.

    • Then out pops the antenna array, including what we believe to be the GPS antenna.

  7. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 9, image 1 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 9, image 2 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 9, image 3 of 3
    • The plucking continues, as we remove the self-emptying speaker, designed to sonically blast out water after your watch takes a dip.

    • After an entirely Series 2-ish experience, we're finally rewarded with something new—a whole new section of RF chips, surely responsible for handling the added LTE functionality.

    • In another new twist, the air vent hole next to the microphone is now populated by what looks like a barometric pressure sensor.

    • Apple touted a new barometric altimeter when it introduced the Series 3 at the Steve Jobs Theater—much to our confusion, since we already found a barometer in last year's model.

    • Time to pull this board!

  8. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 10, image 1 of 2 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 10, image 2 of 2
  9. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 11, image 1 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 11, image 2 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 11, image 3 of 3
    • Last call: back cover. It's press-fit over a teflon-like O-ring, but a thumbs-up and a firm push relieves it of duty.

    • The material has been standardized across watch models and souped up to snazzy ceramic, replacing the previous Ion-X or Sapphire options.

    • It also houses the PPG sensor array that is responsible for sensing heart rate.

    • It would've been cool to see some change from the Series 2 after complaints about accuracy in previous models. As far as wearables go, however, the Apple Watch is the best of the bad.

    • Also it appears that the wireless charging coil has been slightly modified to support most Qi wireless chargers.

    • Lastly, with the new barometric altimeter taking the spot next to the microphone, where did the air vent go? Answer: hiding out right here, next to the diagnostic port.

  10. Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 12, image 1 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 12, image 2 of 3 Apple Watch Series 3 Teardown: step 12, image 3 of 3
    • Here's all the clockwork watchwork!

    • Final big thanks to Circuitwise for giving up a bit of their weekend to help us out!

    • And thanks again to Creative Electron for putting the X(-ray) in "excellent!"

  11. crwdns2878481:0crwdne2878481:0
    • Watch band replacements remain fast and simple.
    • Screen replacements are difficult but do-able—it's the first thing to come off, and detaches via simple ZIF connectors.
    • Battery replacements are tricky but fairly straightforward once you're inside, provided you're armed with a Y000 screwdriver.
    • While not proprietary, incredibly tiny tri-point screws are a repair hinderance.
    • Replacing any of the component cables requires microsoldering.
    • The mostly resin-encased S3 system makes most board-level repairs impossible.
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crwdns2917036:047crwdne2917036:0

Great ! I was waiting for this since the day it was shown at the launch ! First to comment as well I guess

Yolo - crwdns2853112:0crwdne2853112:0

is the rear housing the same as the series 2 as well?

during the announcement, they claimed the watch was made a little thicker.

karl - crwdns2853112:0crwdne2853112:0

What’s the purpose of the air vent that began with Series 2? It’s clearly not for barometric readings since Series 2 lacked a barometric altimeter.

Andrew Estock - crwdns2853112:0crwdne2853112:0

Not sure of I didn't See a barometer at the Apple Watch

eisblock -

does apple tv 4k teardown coming soon? i am curious about power supply voltage and ampere. nice btw.

Muhammad Faisal Kemal - crwdns2853112:0crwdne2853112:0

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