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crwdns2892146:0Miroslav Djuriccrwdnd2892146:0crwdne2892146:0

crwdns2875918:0crwdne2875918:0 crwdns2892120:0crwdne2892120:0 Miroslav Djuric

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[* black] The circle pad consists of a small, donut-ish PCB with traces, a backing plate, and the spring-loaded X-Y sliders.
[* black] The X-Y sliders each have two metal contacts that are always touching the PCB.
-[* black] As you move the sliders up/down and left/right, the metal contacts are on the sliders are adjusting the resistance of the circuit on the PCB.
+[* black] As you move the sliders up/down and left/right, the metal contacts are adjusting the resistance of the circuit on the PCB.
[* black] This, in turn, is registered as movement in whatever game you're playing.
+[* black] Regarding the spring-loaded sliders: A spring inside the mechanism makes the "stick" always return to center. If you wanted to convert the circle pad to more of a "throttle" type joystick — where it doesn't return to center automatically — all you would have to do is take the circle pad apart and remove the spring found within.
+ [* icon_caution] This precarious conversion should only be undertaken by the truly dedicated among us.