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Display keeps asking for the door to be closed but it's already closed

The image that appears on the display when the service door is open, doesn't go off after closing the door. It used to happen intermittently but now it's all the time, completely preventing the machine from working. Anyone knows what kind of detector triggers it and where is it? The door closes fine and flush, there is nothing blocking, the magnets latch.

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Hi @xavierap ,

What is the model number of the coffee machine?

I don’t know the answer but looking at the Moltio Super HD8767/47 parts list there is a door reed sensor listed.

Presumably it is operated by a magnet when the door is closed. Check if there is one and if it is connected securely and working. Try using a magnet near it to see if you can make the error message disappear when the door is open.

Note: Due to the way the URL is shown I cannot link the exact page in this answer in the 1st link above. Type HD8767/47 in the Enter a model# part# or description find? search box to get the parts list. Then type Sensor in the Filter by description search box on the parts list page to view all the sensors in the machine. It gives the location of the sensor but unfortunately I cannot find a parts diagram.

If you have a different model just type the full model number in the search box in the 1st link above to hopefully find the parts list for your exact model.

Hopefully this is of some help.

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Hi @jayeff thanks. It's an HD8768. I will look into this component although it seems to be unavailable in the Netherlands. Also these pages mention a "schematic location". Anyone knows what schematic this refers to, or where to find it, or a service manual? I can find only the owner's manual.

In the meantime I contacted Philips and they've been quite helpful although the machine's out of warranty. They've confirmed the sensor is mechanically actuated. There's an inset lever, it seems to match against a nipple on the door. I've tried pushing it by hand with a toothpick and it seems to move ok, but it doesn't fix the issue, so indeed the sensor seems to be dead.

I guess I can try to buy a replacement, or else just short the sensor, because keeping the door closed is a minor safety feature. But in order to do anything a service manual would be useful.

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@xavierap

Try to find the wiring plug end of the sensor to where it connects and check that there is a solid connection and that the connectors aren't loose or even corroded in the connector plug/socket. Be safety aware and unplug the machine first ;-)

Have read that sometimes the wires were found to be corroded and not that the sensor itself was faulty. Just a thought.

You could try searching for (17800432) 996530072785 which is the part # for the door sensor for your model and see if there are any local suppliers.

Philips aren't known for releasing their service manuals to the public domain ;-(

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Thanks for the ideas, I'll check the connection and wires too if I reach there.

I've found a service manual for another model that's similar enough I think internally snd externally. I think it may have been published before Saeco was acquired by Philips. Indeed no such manuals are now to be found from Philips. I will keep it. On manualslib.com:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/913628...

For now Philips has contacted me by phone, I couldn't answer since I was on the road. I'll see first what they offer (out of warranty).

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@xavierap

There are two disassembly guides for the machine on Ifixit that may help if they are the same model or similar to yours..

Apologies if you have already seen them

Saeco Moltio Reparatur

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Sorry, I did not notice your question earlier. Otherwise my first guess would have be the switch. Parts for the Moltio are easily available at e.g. www.juraprofi.de or www.komtra.de. Your switch here.

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Fixed it finally. Reached under the top cover by trial and with the help of the disassembly guide here.

The failure mode was clear (see attached picture): the contacts of the interruptor were completely corroded. The steam coupling above seems to leak, there are remains visible.

I should have replaced the corroded crimp connectors. Instead I have removed the interruptor detecting door closure and shorted the wires together. This one won't bother me again. The machine works now.

Many thanks to @jayeff for all the pointers.

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Hi @xavierap ,

Hopefully you securely insulated and tied off the shorted wires so that they can't move etc?

Looking at the voltage rating on the sensor switch, it is rated at 240V AC so if for some reason the wires shifted and they weren't insulated for the long term and the machine has a metal body then it could be a potentially lethal hazard. (even electrician's tape comes loose after a while in warm environments).

Maybe better off using a electrical screw connector (example image only to show what I mean) to short out the wires and then wrapping insulation around it. Apologies if you have already done so.

Also it may be prudent to see where the leak was coming from and also fix it, to prevent any further problems from occurring e.g. if a pipe was leaking then eventually it may split wide open.

Cheers.

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Thanks, indeed the wires are now safer than before, out of the way of the pipe, and isolated.

And the off-the-shelf interruptor is rated up to 125 VAC or 30 VDC (only 0.1 A) but the actual voltage of these wires must be much lower judging from their gauge, and the fact that the original crimp connectors were naked, as you can see in the attached images.

The leak is small and the only damage it's done so far is to corrode the connectors. The liquid evaporates and leaves the residue visible in the images. For now that the connector is away from it and no longer exposed, I have decided not to fix it. Anyway it must be a common occurrence, judging from the reports you mentioned of these connectors getting corroded for other people too, and from the choice of coupling (Oetiker clamps).

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@xavierap

I saw those ratings but wondered why the 240V rating was also shown on the case.

It only takes 0.03A of AC current @ >100V AC to cause serious injury, (depends on individual) so the switch is capable of carrying that. Usually switches don't operate at their max. specified rating so it will be less than 0.1A but how much less I don't know.

Then again it might be DC current that is flowing through the switch (I don't know) and 0.1A @ 30V you mightn't even feel.

My thinking was to treat it like it is carrying the max. current (voltage) shown regardless and that way it will be secured safely.

Cheers.

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Xavier crwdns2893898:0crwdne2893898:0
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